Shattered But Not Broken!

Humpty Dumpty sat on a wall, Humpty Dumpty had a great fall; all the king’s horses and all the king’s men couldn’t put Humpty together again. 

I know you remember that old nursery rhyme! Who doesn’t, right? The way I see it, Humpty, who happened to be an egg, was minding his own business, enjoying life, when he fell off a wall. Having fallen, he was shattered into tiny pieces. In fact, he was so shattered, he seemed to be beyond repair.

That old riddle often came to mind during the times I felt the most shattered, the most broken and wounded. There was a point in my life when I could not imagine that my shattered pieces could ever be put together again. I could not see how something so shattered could ever achieve wholeness. Just as in the nursery rhyme, my thoughts were–if all the king’s horses and all the king’s men couldn’t put the pieces together again, then who could? It appeared, that was the end of Humpty Dumpty. But, was it?

I would like to share with you the following excerpt, from The Life Model, Living From the Heart Jesus Gave You, by E. James Wilder, et al., Chapter 1, Pages 15-17, which outlines the journey or path towards wholeness, where our shattered pieces can be put back together again. The following speaks to what that journey might look like and how it can be achieved.

It has been said that God is not the great magician–He is the great physician. That saying addresses a question which people need to think about clearly. Whether fixes from God are always “quick.” People typically seek the quickest way out of pain, which is understandable. Pain, of course, demands immediate attention. A more mature approach, however, is to seek God’s redemption in the middle of the pain, asking Him to bring healing into our wounds–(which can be a much slower process). God does His work in us, pointing us toward wholeness, even while we are in pain. But it is not simply His work; it is our work too. It takes maturity and tenacity on our part to achieve wholeness, and that means persistently dealing with our pain.

There may be times when we are not in a place where we are free from pain, but we can still experience God’s amazing redemption. An often-quoted passage in II Corinthians 12 describes how the apostle Paul learned a key lesson. When he was struck with a tormenting problem which did not go away, even though he pleaded with the Lord three times, he got an answer he was not looking for: God works through weaknesses. What a profound discovery–he learned to delight in weaknesses, in insults, in hardships, in persecutions, and in difficulties. The good news of the Gospel is that God wants to be with us in the middle of our struggles. That is precisely when He exercises His strength in us. Paul learned to let God be in charge, and to stop asking God to end his hardship. God’s strength flowed through Him because Paul stopped trying to be in control. He let God take over, and God was able to use him more effectively. Paul could delight in suffering because he found it was an opportunity for God’s strength to work through him.

Central to the Christian experience is an unchanging belief that God is at work in all things for the good of those who love Him (Romans 8:28), and that means all things. He is particularly at work when we are stuck in pain that seems to be endless and meaningless. The time-honored Christian approach to pain and wholeness involves our activity as well as God’s: His work in us is to bring redemption to all of the traumas that have broken us, and our work is to strive for maturity as we progress to wholeness.  The word “redemption” is sometimes difficult to understand, simply because it is used in so many contexts. Here is the way it is used in The Life Model: Redemption is God bringing good out of bad, leading us to wholeness, and the experience of God’s amazing power. Redemption means that out of our greatest pain, can come our most profound personal mission in life.

The biblical understanding of wholeness is succinctly described in the first chapter of James. We are instructed there to consider it pure joy whenever we are in the middle of suffering, because that will lead to wholeness. Suffering tests our faith and builds our endurance, so that we can be mature and complete–not divided, but whole. James cautions that we must ask God for wisdom during this stormy process. It takes total faith to believe that God will  bring us through the storm, or we will be unable to “receive anything” from God; without total faith in God we remain “double-minded”–divided (verse 8). Wholeness comes as we let Him lead us through the storms. We are to welcome suffering because it brings down the walls in our fragmented life so that we can become mature and complete (verse 4). It is God’s intent to bring redemption to the wounded and fragmented places in our lives so that our weaknesses can be transformed into strengths. That can happen when we honestly address our pain. Suffering can lead to wholeness if we embrace it. It will take endurance and time, but the benefits are well worth it.

I look back in time and so clearly see what was not obvious to me then. I see God’s hand–His heart–in every tiny part of my journey. Although, I discovered there are no quick fixes from the things in life that create pain, there is a path to wholeness. It is not achieved quickly–it takes both time and endurance.

Yes, life’s circumstances do have a way of leaving us feeling shattered into a million pieces, and, while it might feel true, reality is, we are not broken beyond repair–the shattered pieces can be put back together again.

Although, all the king’s horses and all the king’s men couldn’t put Humpty’s shattered pieces together again, as I’ve discovered, and you can too, there is someone who can.

I promise you the journey is worth it!humpty-dumpty

Kiki

61 The Spirit of the Lord God is upon me, because the Lord has anointed and qualified me (Jesus) to preach the Gospel of good tidings to the meek, the poor, and afflicted; He has sent me to bind up and heal the brokenhearted, to proclaim liberty to the [physical and spiritual] captives and the opening of the prison and of the eyes to those who are bound. Isaiah 61:1

From there he went all over Galilee. He used synagogues for meeting places and taught people the truth of God. God’s kingdom was his theme–that beginning right now they were under God’s government, a good government! He also healed people of their diseases and of the bad effects of their bad lives. Word got around the entire Roman province of Syria. People brought anybody with an ailment, whether mental, emotional, or physical. Jesus healed them, one and all. More and more people came, the momentum gathering. Besides those from Galilee, crowds came from the “Ten Towns” across the lake, others up from Jerusalem and Judea, still others from across the Jordan. Matthew 4:23-25

28 And we know that God causes everything to work together[a] for the good of those who love God and are called according to his purpose for them. Romans 8:28

Related Posts:

Learning To Dance

Lies, Deception And Other Tangled Webs

Up Close And Personal

Contact: Kiki @ DancingWithGod@charter.net

683510488_2prej-l3.jpg

Back to top

About these ads

3 thoughts on “Shattered But Not Broken!

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s